“Aviation, as a whole, accounts for roughly three per cent of global CO2 emissions, and business aviation is a tiny fraction of that,” says Stanley Bugeja, Managing Director of DC Aviation Malta.

Nonetheless, Mr Bugeja acknowledges that this is not an excuse for the business aviation industry to sit back – in fact, the industry has committed to achieving ‘net zero’ carbon emissions by 2050.

The plan is to reach this goal through a number of measures, but mainly through improved technology and the use of Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF).

Unfortunately, SAF is not yet widely available and bringing such product to island nations like Malta makes it even more complicated and expensive.

“There are other ways of achieving sustainable growth and leading by example, even when the situation is challenging. We at DC Aviation are committed to improving our carbon footprint,” Mr Bugeja says.

In light of this, DC Aviation Group will be offering all of its customers the opportunity to offset their flight’s carbon footprint through CTX Global, the world’s leading voluntary carbon credits trading platform.

“All of our charter and management customers welcomed this initiative and we, as a company, will offset one million litres of fuel, making the DC Aviation Malta FBO probably the first net-zero FBO in 2022,” adds Mr Bugeja.

DC Aviation promises to keep this initiative up at least until SAF is available at the Malta International Airport.

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